5 Tips to Improve Construction Software Implementation

by THIAGO NASCIMENTO, Raken, Inc.

It’s often been mentioned here how Raken software for daily reporting and other types of construction software can save time, problems, and money for construction projects. And in addition to just routine reporting, Raken of course can be used to issue safety warnings and updates, as well as be a means to compile data for court actions. So it would seem that construction firm managers, supervisors, and even workers would be embracing reporting methods that can be used by anyone with a portable device. And in many cases, they are.

But the construction industry is traditionally not a technological one, and innovations of a digital sort may not be received with as much enthusiasm as upgrades to equipment. Acceptance of change comes easier if employees feel “upstairs”. So below are some “spoonfulls of sugar” to help that software medicine go down.

5. Incentives, Contests, And Rewards
In the past, this has been an extremely popular way to get employees to adopt new practices or try harder with existing ones by offering gifts, pay bonuses, or time off as a reward for doing so. However, the legality of this has been questioned, with various employee advocacy groups likening the practice to bribing. As a result, managers are advised get legal advice before proceeding with this, and keep the worth of any “gifts” small. Ice cream day, anyone?

4. Work Devices
Whether it’s because they’re afraid that they will be broken, stolen, or just don’t like the idea of using personal devices for work, some employees don’t want to use theirs on the job. Instead, management should consider purchasing and signing out these devices to employees for on the job use.

3. Appropriate Training
It certainly seems as though we’ve all embraced the digital revolution, but that’s not the case. Don’t assume that all employees naturally are comfortable with new software packages. Offer training in its use, and make sure employees are able to receive additional help in mastering it if they need it.

2. Employee Feedback
You think it sounds great, but is that software you’ve purchased truly something that will be beneficial and enhance your workers’ performances? Check in with them a few weeks after implementation for opinions on the product’s ease of use and any problems that they are experiencing with it.

1. No Surprises
If you are unveiling a new software package that you expect multiple employees to use, alert them to this early and often. Make sure that they are fully aware of any changes that will be coming because of this, and what if anything that will be expected of them because of it. Getting the word out early can be an effective way to make new program implementation easier for all employees at a construction firm.